When I wrote “Ya Albi,” my first goal was to honor the story of my parents. Both of my parents are immigrants from Taiwan. Though they are not refugees, I can only imagine what they still had to go through in order to adapt and succeed somewhere so far from friends, family, and what they know....

SO….MUCH……..WALKING……We walked at least 2 miles everyday (I’m not exaggerating). Walking to the train station, walking from the train station to our destination, to our hotel, exploring. Walking everywhere. But hey, exercise so no big deal....

When Richard Brown from the Global Heartbeater Project approached Moth to Flame about developing a corporate video marketing strategy for a new invention called The SuperTrike, we were excited to be a part of it. Working with a new startup that is keen on building a solid video marketing strategy is quite rare because video production tends to take up quite a bit of resources and time that startups usually cannot budget for. Richard, however, is an innovator and he knew first hand that video marketing could help sp...

Filming the debut video of BattleBold's brand has been an exciting process. It is always an honor having the opportunity to help a company build their company image. A video can really say a lot about what a company stands for, and what they want their target market to feel when they think about a particular brand or product....

It’s been crazy crunch time for Moth to Flame as we rush to the finish line with “Two Roads,” our new short for the Louisiana Film Prize. This year has been a bit more hectic in terms of post-production scheduling, because each team member has continued to take on bigger and better projects and we collectively have more projects to juggle on top of this one. In addition, we have two cuts of our film this year (instead of one, like last year’s A Bird’s Nest)… a 15-minute cut for the actual Louisiana Film Prize itself and also a much...

After we got through the first 3 days of production, the last 2 days became less stressful. This is the stage that I like to call “Meh.” Basically, after the initial shock factor of dealing with intense work schedules and a variety of temperamental problems, the entire team became so used to (and tired of) solving or accepting these problems that by the last two days any problem ceased to become a big deal. It is going to rain in 2 minutes? Cool. It is pouring outside? Cool. The data dump froze again right before an incredibly emotionally difficult scene...